A baker’s dozen

n15.jpgRideability? Is that a word? I say yes — I love how the word “idea” lives right inside it. Because, gosh, one gets a lot of ideas while riding a bike, such as I did, twice now, in the neighboring city of Norcross, GA (see a few pix from the first ride here). I’m giving a free presentation to new and returning women on bikes there soon, so I wanted to road-test its current “rideability” realities. I found so much good, and so much potential for good, and was able to offer my point people there a few ideas to get the ball bikes rolling.

I thought you may be interested in my basic Baker’s Dozen list of spots I try to hit when I do these city audits (see list below). Throughout, I consider bike infrastructure, bike rack availability/location (secure? convenient?), access (including through parking lots), safe routes between destinations, speed limits (and if they are observed and enforced), intersection usability, driver culture and habits, geography and other physical features, way finding signage, and more. You may want to try it in your own city, and encourage your city leaders and planners to do so as well. (Let’s not even talk about the City of Dunwoody’s bike lane I named Pointy, okay? Clearly not road-tested by decision makers. Here are my final words on it.)

Baker’s Dozen Audit for Bike Rideability

1. City hall/police headquarters

2. Schools (from preschools through college)

3. Community garden(s)/farmers market

4. Post office

5. Parks

6. Places of worship

7. Corporations

8. Retail/restaurants/professional services

9. Arts/culture organizations

10. Supermarkets

11. Residential neighborhoods

12. Historic locations

13. Any city-specific assets

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